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Choose PVC Pipe


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Choose PVC Pipe


Chicago Deserves Clean, Affordable Water.

Clean, affordable water.  It shouldn’t be a luxury in today’s world. Cities such as Chicago, IL expect it.  And it’s within our nation’s reach, as local officials across the country increasingly choose durable, lead-free PVC pipe to replace corrosion-prone iron piping infrastructure. Contact Chicago’s Department of Water Management at 312.744.4420 and tell them you support the greater use of PVC pipe for the delivery of safe, clean water throughout the region!

Why PVC?


Why PVC?


“Iron piping is not only failing due to corrosion but is increasingly associated with public health and safety issues.  Recent studies show, for example, that the cement mortar lining used in ductile iron pipes is a potential source of water contamination and that there is an association between iron corrosion and increased levels of lead in water.” [Bonner R. Cohen via The Hill]

"Tom Hagerty, director of public works in Waukegan, said municipalities have moved away from lead pipes to deliver water over the decades, with Waukegan installing PVC in recent years." [Chicago Tribune]

“Facing many of the same financial constraints that bedevil Flint, Burton Mayor Paula Zelenko petitioned and fought Genesee County for her city to be allowed to have a procurement process for pipe replacement that included competitive bidding.  Her plan to upgrade Burton’s water system predates the Flint fiasco.  The project, which began in June 2014, will, upon completion in 2019, have replaced 19 miles of corroded, dilapidated iron pipe with lead-free, non-corrosive PVC pipe at a cost $2.2 million lower than the nearest bidder.” [Bonner R. Cohen via The Hill

"The Safe Drinking Water Act, enacted in 1986, required the Environmental Protection Agency to set standards for the concentration of lead in public pipes, with a push for ‘lead-free.’ This stirred the country on a road towards replacing old water pipes with PVC, as an eco-friendly alternative.” [Salon.com]

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PVC Pipe Facts


PVC Pipe Facts


PVC pipe is a simple, completely safe and inert material, unlike iron piping which needs anti-corrosion chemicals to safely operate to protect the public from possible lead contamination and pathogens.  It’s time to relegate these complicated, risky iron pipe systems to the scrap heap of history.

Over 40,000 North American water utilities use PVC pipe today, and more than one million miles are in service – or about 78 percent of all new drinking water distribution pipes installed on the continent. Some 10 million quality control tests have been conducted on water carried through PVC pipe since it was introduced in North America and around the world. All of them confirm the product is safe and beneficial to public health. [Uni-Bell.org]

PVC pipes have a life expectancy of 100 years. [Uni-Bell.org]

According to a Utah State University study, PVC pipes offer a high degree of resilience in freezing conditions. [Utah State University]

For every foot of 8” pipe replaced in Tryon, NC in 2014, area taxpayers saved approximately 30% by replacing deteriorating metallic infrastructures with durable PVC pipe. [Utah State University]

The city of Pleasanton, CA found PVC pipe to be “70 percent cheaper than ductile iron.” [U.S. Mayor]

News Clips


News Clips


Chicago – it’s time to replace old metallic pipes!

“Meanwhile, the plumbing in big cities such as Philadelphia and Chicago is showing its age. Unless these cities—among many others—replace their lead plumbing root and branch, as DC has begun to do, they are at risk of undergoing a crisis comparable to what we are seeing in Flint.”


"[T]he city checks just 50 homes for lead contamination in water every three years, the minimum required by the federal government. And it rarely tests in neighborhoods where childhood lead poisoning has emerged as a concern. Those areas include neighborhoods on the South and West sides, where lead poisoning rates are consistently higher than the national average.” 

Infographics


Infographics


Contact


Contact


Contact your water utility here:

Department Main Office

Water Management

Phone: 312.744.4420

Fax: 312.744.7119

http://www.cityofchicago.org/city/en/depts/water.html